Brendon Burchard is the world’s leading high performance coach, a three-time New York Times bestselling author, and is in the Top 100 Most Followed Public Figures on Facebook – with more than 10 million fans across his pages. His personal development videos have been viewed more than 100 million times and Success Magazine named him “one of the Top 25 Most Influential Leaders in Personal Growth and Achievement.”
Trump’s Cabinet picks also have MLM links. First there’s his education secretary, Betsy DeVos, whose husband’s family fortune derives from its ownership of Amway, the world’s biggest MLM, with $9.5 billion in annual 2015 revenue on everything from soap to cat food. While the company’s sales have been in decline, falling from a peak of $11.8 billion in 2013, Amway remains the 29th largest privately held company in the U.S., according to Forbes.
MLM and direct selling programs also offer very low barriers into entrepreneurship, often providing training, support, and ample encouragement along the way.  As retirees begin to realize they need activities that keep them busy, relevant, in good health, and connected to others, the time, energy and cost to participate in these kinds of companies make them very appealing to large segments of the population caught up in these dynamics.
I initially spoke to a retired friend who said she joined a health and beauty direct selling company as a means of meeting new people. She had recently remarried and moved to a new location, so she combined the practice of meeting new people with making extra money.  After almost a decade in the business, she’s built a small niche business with family and friends despite switching to from one company to another competitor after three years.

I know there are a few companies, like Mary Kay and Lia Sophia, who have a generally positive image, but there are many more, often built around some investment scheme, which continue to give this sector a bad image. If you scan the Internet, you will find dozens of negative articles, like "What's Wrong With Multi-Level Marketing?", but very few singing their praises.
Hayley Hobson shares important tips on how to approach the invitation when recruiting. Click below to get 3 hours of Live coaching with me, Eric Worre, as I give you all of my best strategies and scripts to effectively invite prospects to hear about your opportunity without coming across as pushy or salesy. https://networkmarketingpro.com/inviting/…
To understand how network marketing works, it may be helpful to think of a business model that most consumers are familiar with, franchising. In a franchise, an owner pays a company for the right to do business using that company’s products, services, and name. The parent company agrees to provide the owner with training, development, advertising and marketing support. While the name on the outside of the building is that of the parent company, the actual location is privately owned by an independent business owner.
But if you understand how traditional direct selling used to work before MLMs, you’ll see that they really aren’t in the direct sales biz. If your grandpa sold encyclopedias door-to-door when he was in college, ask him if he was required to buy the encyclopedia sets himself in order to sell them to others. Ask him if he had to personally purchase a certain number of encyclopedias a month or year to keep his job. And then ask him if he was pressured to recruit more salesmen beneath him. The answer to all of those questions will be no. He didn’t make any money recruiting people to be salesmen — he made his money selling encyclopedias to housewives.

Because of its relational aspect, the products usually involved, and the gender of the consultants themselves, women are the predominant target for MLM strategies. However, the gender proportion shifts significantly in the case of financial and/or insurance companies. When it’s time to develop a financial portfolio or consider a term life-insurance policy, it’s usually a joint decision made by husband and wife, or by the head of the household regardless of gender.
In the late 1940’s and early 1950’s (after WWII) the concept of a franchise business gained traction. In a franchise, you rent the business model that someone else (Franchisor) has perfected. One of the very first franchises was started by John Pemberton in 1886 when he created a beverage with a secret recipe and licensed bottling territories to others. This became Coca Cola. Rexall Drug Stores and even General Motors started out as Franchises. As in any new industry or business model there are abuses by unethical promoters and business persons (think of the robber barons and anti-trust regulations). By the 1960’s franchising was getting a black eye. Deceptive sales practices, double selling the same franchise territories to different persons and financial insolvency of the Franchisor were rampant. Eventually, in 1979 federal regulation came into play. The unscrupulous and under-funded Franchisors went away and the legitimate players who complied with the FTC regulations changed and became giants. (Think Subway, McDonalds and others.)
At the corporate level, MLM professionals develop an easily communicated mission and image, and create resources that facilitate that communication. The key to knowing how to communicate this message to customers is knowing and understanding them. Therefore, effective MLM begins with data, and builds upon that data throughout a campaign. With the sales and customer information generated at each presentation, companies can better discern what products to acquire and/or develop, how to best portray them to their audience, and how to tailor their message to different market segments.
Ask yourself whether you would enjoy selling products to the public. Find out how many hours a week your sponsor and other distributors spent on the business when they joined and how much time they spend now. Remember that no matter how good the product and how solid the plan, you’ll need to invest sweat equity and money for your investment to pay off. Consider the other demands of the business — for example, going to training, recruiting new distributors, managing paperwork, recording inventory, and shipping products.  
At the corporate level, MLM professionals develop an easily communicated mission and image, and create resources that facilitate that communication. The key to knowing how to communicate this message to customers is knowing and understanding them. Therefore, effective MLM begins with data, and builds upon that data throughout a campaign. With the sales and customer information generated at each presentation, companies can better discern what products to acquire and/or develop, how to best portray them to their audience, and how to tailor their message to different market segments.
While there are plenty of men who join MLMs, 75% of all participants are women. But that doesn’t mean that if you’re a dude you don’t need to understand exactly how MLMs work, as there’s a chance your wife will one day come to you with the idea of joining one. Hopefully you’ll have a conversation together about it, and hopefully, using the points we lay out below, you’ll be able to make the case that it’s a bad idea for her, and for your family.

As one of the top 10 fastest growing MLM’s, ranked on fortune 500, raved about by MLM review sites , all natural weight loss and wellness products, no GMO’s, No gluten etc and 10’s of thousands of glowing testimonials they are hard to overlook. The retention rate is excellent, the company has a 1% return rate on products which is unheard of as well as the best compensation plan available to any MLM rep. I think it’s safe to say if you do another article like this you would do your readers a great service by checking Plexus out. I really did enjoy the article as I am a multi MLM participant.
Technically speaking, pyramiding is an illegal practice of a company that solicits their members to recruit more members, more than selling the product. In turn, the primary source of income for its members is the number of members they have recruited instead of the products they have sold over time. Clearly, not all MLMs are pyramid schemes, but it all seems like a matter of degree.
Meet Jack Canfield Global thought leader, motivational speaker, corporate trainer, and entrepreneur, Jack Canfield is the originator of the Chicken Soup for the Soulseries and is the co-author of The Success Principles: How to Get From Where You Are to Where You Want to Be.  Affectionately known as “America’s #1 Success Coach,” Jack has studied and reported on what makes successful people different. He knows what motivates them, what drives them, and what inspires them. Go Pro with Eric Worre is proudly brought to you by: * Go Pro Recruiting Mastery – the world’s #1 generic training event for the Network Marketing Profession. Join us December 4-6, at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada. You will hear from top international thought leaders including Magic Johnson, John Maxwell, and dozes of Million-Dollar Earners. It’s an extraordinary event that you and your team can’t afford to miss. To learn more, go to GoProRecruiting.com. Show Notes Jack describes the changes that he’s witnessed in the work landscape and how people make a living. [1:45] Jack forecasts what the future has in store for people who are resistant to change and new ways of doing things. [4:10] Eric and Jack discuss the opportunities that are available to today’s entrepreneurs and why Network Marketing is such a desirable option for most. [7:05] Jack and Eric explain why they think Network Marketing is misunderstood and what it takes to be a success in the Profession. [11:20] Jack dispels the myth of saturation in Network Marketing. [17:25] Jack provides advice to those who might be hesitant or jaded about the Network Marketing Profession. [19:22] Jack praises the power of word of mouth promotion. [22:36]  Jack offers advice on growth for those involved in Network Marketing. [24:30]  Jack explains the importance of building networks in the world today. [27:47]  Jack talks about people’s need for recognition and appreciation and how Network Marketing meets those needs. [30:58] Eric and Jack discuss how Network Marketing provides community for those involved in it. [33:47]  Jack offers advice to those interested in joining the Network Marketing Profession. [37:32] Questions or Comments?  Do you have questions you would like Eric to answer in future podcasts or comments on the show you’d like to share? Just email us at [email protected]
I spent about 3 years selling Amway back in the 70’s. There was a lot of hype but I made enough money to achieve several of my more modest financial goals. I went on to use some of what I learned to make extra money in various ventures and eventually started a small business out of my home. The business grew until mainstream retailers began offering the same product I was selling at comparable prices. The MLM as a learning tool has some value as long as the product is decent. This MLM ranking is a good way to attract attention and I am curious about Your service. I am selective about what I spend my time and effort on.

However, there are some things we do know. First, consultants need to make $100 in sales every six months. That’s a very reasonable requirement. But, it may just apply to being a member. You’ll probably need more sales to earn from your team. Second, Steeped Tea does encourage online marketing, like through social media sites. That’s always good and you may even be able to sell online.
Many people who complain about network marketing say they don't like the idea of "using" their friends and family to make money. However, network marketing doesn't reward people for using others. Success in network marketing comes from helping others reach their goals. A person cannot earn income from the efforts of their recruits without investing time in assisting them to earn income, as well. Admittedly, some network marketers see potential recruits as dollar signs, but those people are not as successful as those who are genuine in their effort to help their recruits do well.
In April 2006, the FTC proposed a Business Opportunity Rule intended to require all sellers of business opportunities—including MLMs—to provide enough information to enable prospective buyers/participants to make an informed decision about acquiring/joining a business venture with information disclosed about the average likelihood of monetary profitability (and the extent of monetary profitability, if any) of acquiring/joining the business venture. In March 2008, however, the FTC removed "Network Marketing" (i.e. MLM) companies from the proposed Business Opportunity Rule, thus leaving MLM participants without the ability to make an informed choice of entering or not entering MLMs based on the disclosed likelihood of success and profitability:

I initially spoke to a retired friend who said she joined a health and beauty direct selling company as a means of meeting new people. She had recently remarried and moved to a new location, so she combined the practice of meeting new people with making extra money.  After almost a decade in the business, she’s built a small niche business with family and friends despite switching to from one company to another competitor after three years.
You've probably heard horror stories about people ending up with a garage full of expensive water filters or other items. This happens because only other distributors will purchase the product at that price. Your product or service must fill a real need at a fair price, and there should be a large untapped market for it. In other words, it must provide tremendous value so that the customer is the biggest winner.

I spent about 3 years selling Amway back in the 70’s. There was a lot of hype but I made enough money to achieve several of my more modest financial goals. I went on to use some of what I learned to make extra money in various ventures and eventually started a small business out of my home. The business grew until mainstream retailers began offering the same product I was selling at comparable prices. The MLM as a learning tool has some value as long as the product is decent. This MLM ranking is a good way to attract attention and I am curious about Your service. I am selective about what I spend my time and effort on.
But here’s the thing. By recruiting close family members or friends into your downline, you contaminate those relationships with commercialization. You take all that good will you’ve developed with someone over months and years and cash it all in on getting them to be a commission for you. From that moment on, the person won’t be able to tell if your gestures towards intimacy are genuine, or an attempt to get you to buy or distribute product. Perhaps even more sadly, you may lose the ability to tell the difference yourself.
Multilevel marketing (MLM) is an attractive business proposition to many people. It offers the opportunity to become involved in a system for distributing products to consumers. Unlike the person starting a business from scratch, the MLM participant has the support of a direct selling company that supplies the products and sometimes offers training as well.
MLM salespeople are not employees of the MLM company. Participants do not derive a salary/wage, nor do participants receive remuneration from the MLM company for their invested labor and expenses in their MLM "independent business". The income of participants, if any income is made at all, is derived only from commissions on their personal sales or their share of the commissions on the personal sales of their downlines (the MLM compensation structure).
Although there are no specific educational requirements for direct sellers, individuals interested in network marketing may find it beneficial to take advantage of one of the selling and sales management degree programs available in the United States. Some general course topics include professional selling, marketing, prospecting, sales motivation, consumer behavior, customer relations, and sales management.
An issue in determining the legitimacy of a multi-level marketing company is whether it sells its products primarily to consumers or to its members who must recruit new members to buy their products. If it is the former, the company is a legitimate multi-level marketer. If it is the latter, it could be an illegal pyramid scheme. The Federal Trade Commission has been investigating multi-level marketing companies for several decades and has found many that blur the lines between the two. According to industry data, there are 90 million members worldwide, but relatively few earn meaningful income from their efforts. To some observers, that reflects the characteristics of a pyramid scheme.
Many self-proclaimed entrepreneurs send me invitations and accolades to join their favorite Multi-Level Marketing (MLM) or Network Marketing company, but these all sound like "get rich quick" schemes to me. For me, the essence of an entrepreneur is creating something new and innovative, whereas an MLM is a traditional formula on an existing product with a high premium on pyramiding. 

First of all, Avon “has” been. Second, Avon really needs to work on their appeal to a younger generation. Third, Avon makes it difficult for representatives to make any money unless you are purchasing a ton of catalogs and knocking on doors. The company really needs to allow representatives to advertise online, and I don’t mean spamming friends on a Facebook or Twitter feed.
As far as the retirement saving crisis is concerned, more and more people are coming to terms with the fact that they probably aren’t going to be able to save enough money to just sit around and slowly deplete their nest egg from age 62 to 100.  With the average 50 year-old estimated to have less than $50,000 in retirement savings, there is an obvious need to find alternative ways to either save more or generate supplemental income starting now, and continuing throughout retirement.  Moving beyond just the dollars and cents, boomers are growing tired of feeling guilty or bad about their past savings habits and are interested in moving towards possible solutions.
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Both the Amway and Herbalife cases underscore one of the problems of prosecuting alleged pyramid schemes: There is no federal law defining the crime, leaving it to the courts to interpret and pricey lawyers to find wiggle room. The debate is also clouded by the rhetoric of free markets. At the far right end of that debate is the DeVos family, which has donated $200 million to Republicans over the years, and owns a company that combines Christian fundamentalism with extremist free-market ideology and maintains such a grip on many of those who join it that some, fearful for their lives and harassed mercilessly, went into hiding after they sought to expose it.
The legal distinction between MLMs and traditional pyramid schemes has been characterized by many authorities as a legal fiction. Jurisdictions that retain a legal distinction between MLM pyramid businesses versus illegal pyramid schemes retain said distinction on two key distinguishing features: 1) that MLMs always encompass the sale of actual products/services, while traditional illegal pyramid schemes ordinarily do not (though sometimes they do), and 2) that climbing an MLM pyramid is overwhelmingly statistically improbable (especially to its highest participant levels) but not theoretically impossible, whereas climbing a traditional illegal pyramid scheme is both statistically and theoretically impossible.[citation needed]
The key factor that has made network marketing so attractive is that independent business owners not only have the ability to sell products and services to retail customers they are also able to expand their business by setting up others in their own businesses as well. This is commonly known as “sponsoring” in the MLM industry. Sponsoring others allow a business owner to not only profit from what he directly sells, but also allows him to profit from the sales production of those he has sponsored.
Eric Worre's Go Pro has become the de facto bible of network marketing. Eric takes his more than 25 years experience in the profession and boils it down to nuts and bolts practical wisdom you can learn and apply. If you want to succeed, if you are serious about being a network marketing professional, make this book the centerpiece of your library! --Chris Widener, author of the Art of Influence
Go Pro Recruiting Mastery – the world’s #1 generic training event for the Network Marketing Profession.  Join us December 4-6 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada.  You will hear from top thought leaders including Magic Johnson, John Maxwell, and dozens of Million-Dollar Earners.  It’s an extraordinary event that you and your team can’t afford to miss.
Independent non-salaried participants, referred to as distributors (variously called "associates", "independent business owners", "independent agents", etc.), are authorized to distribute the company's products or services. They are awarded their own immediate retail profit from customers plus commission from the company, not downlines, through a multi-level marketing compensation plan, which is based upon the volume of products sold through their own sales efforts as well as that of their downline organization.
Daria M. Brezinski Ph.D, a practicing psychologist and former marketing director for a multi-level marketing magazine, echoes these sentiments.  “Many people don’t realize that multi-level marketing companies are successful because they help people satisfy a number of important human needs, including feeling significant, having connections, learning something new, and making a difference.  I have heard people in network marketing say again and again, ‘I’m doing this because I’m meeting amazing people … making so many connections … and I feel so good about myself.’”
MaryAnne, I would recommend finding a product that you LOVE, a product that you feel can benefit the people around you and who you feel integrity with. You want to find their products useful so that you will feel good about buying them every month and want to share them with other. It is a business, but you also want to be able to have fun with it too
Still, there is a bad side. There are many Avon distributors out there now and the products can even be purchased online. This creates considerable competition, making it much more difficult to get ahead. You’re likely to get some sales no matter what. But, many distributors find that they can’t sell enough to justify their costs and the effort involved.
Well they were hot…this company was caught in the act and had some shade thrown their way after they were found to have been over-inflating their health products for consumer purchase.  But really though?  What company do you know that doesn’t do this in the MLM health industry? It seems like a common practice, even if its “just a bit,” so they are able to pay out commissions made.  Some perspective for the shade…their fiber product was 900% more costly than “leading alternatives” and their Trioten protein blend was 600% more pricey as well when comparing their products to companies such as Herbalife and Shaklee.

Network marketing, also known as Multi-Level Marketing (MLM), is a business model where independent contractors buy into a company and earn a commission on the products they sell. The profession appeals to many people because they can be their own boss, set their own hours, and work towards their own success. It is a big commitment, but network marketing can be a very lucrative career.


Well if you didn’t know before, this company is all about body shapers and nutritional products, with a “greens line” in their product line up as well.  The company got some built up heat in 2015, but have later cooled down a bit.  There was minimum quota of $112 that had to be met every month in order to earn commissions from the company and after a while their distributors had a hard time keeping up with these expectations. Not everyone (including their grandmothers) needs more than one or two body shapers. LOL.
Hi,Im quite interested about your networking business and the most important for me is the efficacy of the products, because i believe when the product is very effective for your health and wellness is the key factor to become successful in mlm business, I’ve been involve already in 3 networking companies before like forever living products,royale business club and alphanetworld corporation in the philippines but i will not pursue my dreams in life, I have been experiencing so many trainings but still im not a succesful yet.I believe in an mlm business and It is now my passion to do for the rest of my life. As of now my home base is in United States and im looking a succesful mentor who help me to pursue to become achievers in mlm business ombine with binary program.

In 1959, two employees of Nutrilite, Rick de Vos and Jan van Andel, founded their own company: Amway. Amway was created using the MLM organizational structure and paved the way for MLM companies to be established in other countries like Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, Germany, and France. Amway allowed for companies like Panasonic, Palmolive, and MasterCard to include network marketing in their omnichannel marketing strategies. Amway's success has even led them sponsor an NBA arena, the Orlando Magic's Amway Center (and the older Amway Arena), since 1989.
The interviews and psychological connections lead me to conclude that MLM and NM companies, along with other small businesses opportunities, are important considerations for anyone entering retirement.  In fact, I believe the concept of starting a business for retirement income will become one of the most significant trends impacting retirement in the 21st century.  But it has to start with redefining entrepreneurship and framing it into a retirement lifestyle.  That means helping people find ways to turn a passion, hobby, or personal desire into extra money in their pocket… not to mention helping people see the importance of  planning for the non-financial aspects of retirement such as replacing a work identity, staying relevant and connected, as well as keeping mentally and physically fit. 

A: To help you understand what network marketing is, I must first explain what it isn't. First, network marketing isn't a pyramid scheme. Pyramids are programs similar to chain letters where people just invest money based on the promise that other people will put in money that will filtrate back to them and somehow, they'll get rich. A pyramid is strictly a money game and has no basis in real commerce. Normally, there's no product involved at all, just money changing hands. Modern-day pyramids may have a product, but it's clearly there just to disguise the money game.
Well if you didn’t know before, this company is all about body shapers and nutritional products, with a “greens line” in their product line up as well.  The company got some built up heat in 2015, but have later cooled down a bit.  There was minimum quota of $112 that had to be met every month in order to earn commissions from the company and after a while their distributors had a hard time keeping up with these expectations. Not everyone (including their grandmothers) needs more than one or two body shapers. LOL.
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